Chemistry Seminar: Professor Lee Brammer

Brammer_Lee

Presenter

Professor Lee Brammer
Department of Chemistry, University of Sheffield

After graduating with a degree in Chemistry and obtaining a PhD in Inorganic Chemistry from University of Bristol, Dr. Brammer undertook postdoctoral work at University of New Orleans and Brookhaven National Laboratory as a NATO postdoctoral fellow. He began his independent academic career at University of Missouri-St. Louis in 1990, where he was Assistant Professor and then Associate Professor of Inorganic Chemistry. He returned to the UK in 2001 to join the University of Sheffield, where he is Professor of Chemistry.

His research interests involve studies of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), particularly for gas separation and catalysis; fundamental studies of intermolecular interactions, particularly hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds; and, more generally, studies of dynamic behaviour in the solid state. The work involves characterisation of the materials synthesised by a combination of techniques, including in situ crystallography, spectroscopy, adsorption methods and computational modelling, and encompasses collaborations with a number of research groups.


Abstract:

Dynamic behaviour and catalysis in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)

The seminar will focus on two areas of interest in my group that relate to the class of crystalline porous materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In the first part of the lecture I will discuss strategies for using MOFs to embed catalytic centres to provide active, well-characterised single-site heterogeneous catalysts. In the second part I will discuss flexibility and guest-responsive dynamic behaviour in MOF system that we have recently developed.

References
Chem. Soc. Rev. 2017, 46, 5444-5462.
Nat. Chem. 2017, 9, 882-889.
Chem. Sci. 2016, 7, 2037-2050
Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018, 57, 4532-4537.
Inorg. Chem. 2018, 57, 1171-1183.

Tagged in North Terrace campus, Physical Sciences, Chemistry, For current students, Research seminar, For researchers