News & Events

Learn about what’s trending in science at the University of Adelaide with the latest news, events and social engagement from across the faculty and schools.

Science events

Science news

What's trending in science?

Local boost for AgTech, food and wine start-ups

Start-up companies in agricultural technology, food and wine are being given a guiding hand with a new business incubator launched at the University of Adelaide’s Waite campus.

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Shedding new light in many directions

In a unique initiative, Defence Science and Technology and the University of Adelaide are conducting dual-use research that has found applications in defence, mining, medicine, soil forensics and archaeology.

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Podcast: Koalafications for becoming a zookeeper

Animal science graduate Michelle Birkett talks about her dream job as a zookeeper in Sarah Holloway’s latest ‘Seize the Yay’ podcast.

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Trapping atoms to protect Australia’s groundwater

A unique new facility at the University of Adelaide will help protect Australia’s precious groundwater from overuse and contamination.

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New PhD opportunities in environmental remote sensing

New environmental remote sensing PhD opportunities are available working with researchers from our School of Biological Sciences and the CSIRO.

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Deep breath: this sea snake gathers oxygen through its forehead

Only fish have gills, right? Wrong. Scientists have found a snake that can breathe through the top of its own head.

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Why are fossils more often male?

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that fossil and museum collections around the world are home to more male than female mammals.

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Restrained or unrestrained – Dogs travelling in cars set for a ‘ruff’ ride

Researchers call for compulsory testing of in-car dog restraints and better education about the dangers of having pets loose in your car.

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Tackling the causes of the Amazon forest fires

If we are so concerned for the rainforest why don’t we do more globally to help protect it?

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It’s common for dogs to be scared of going to the vet

A new study finds up to 40 per cent of owners report their pet dogs are scared while being examined by a vet.

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Zinc helps body fight pneumonia

Scientists show that zinc in your diet can protect you from the main bacterial cause of pneumonia.

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Spaghetti and mud pies scoop 3-Minute Thesis final

The depth and diversity of research student projects in the Faculty of Sciences was once again on display at this week's final of the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition.

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Vet nurses vs vet techs - What’s the difference?

Could veterinary technicians help alleviate pressure and make a vet's job easier?

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Research giants team up to boost primary industries sector

Collaborative research will expand to embrace expertise in areas such as engineering, mathematics, computer science, big data, and machine learning, for the application of new technologies.

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Why is the colour blue so rare in nature?

Blue is a very prominent colour on earth. But when it comes to nature, blue is very rare. Less than 1 in 10 plants have blue flowers and far fewer animals are blue.

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Not all weeds are bad - Some may actually be good for Australian grasslands

Recent case studies have revealed an overall positive relationships between the diversity of native species and presence of weedy species, notably in Mediterranean Biome grasslands.

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Hip, hip… neigh! Birthday time for the University’s oldest horses

Roseworthy campus' oldest horses turned 28 and celebrated with carrot cake, party hats and lots of friends.

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Do fruit tree nets impact the ability of bees to carry pollen?

Researchers to collaborate with industry to explore the effect of netting on beehive health, set and quality of apples.

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Students claim high-steaks judging competition

Agriculture, animal science and vet students perform a cut above the rest at the Australian Intercollegiate Meat Judging conference.

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New genetic analysis reveals breeding history of modern humans

Modern humans interbred with at least five different archaic human groups as they moved out of Africa and across Eurasia, genetic analysis reveals.

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Adelaide scientist wins ‘bronze’ at global neurophotonics event

A project to map the hearing capability of zebrafish has won Mengke Han third prize at the global Frontiers in Neurophotonics’ summer school.

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Mediterranean drought-tolerant vines set for Australian experiment

Wine researchers are investigating drought-tolerant grape varieties from Cyprus for their suitability for Australian conditions.

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$35.6 million boost for sciences' research infrastructure

Research for a range of industrial sectors including scientific, advanced manufacturing, defence, resources, biomedical and agriculture has received a major boost.

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New ‘vet tech’ degree to target emerging skills gap

A new three-year Bachelor of Veterinary Technology at the University’s Roseworthy campus will train ‘paraveterinary’ health care specialists.

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Moo-ve over methane... Scientists show we can breed cattle that produce less gassy emissions

Animal scientists have found the genetics of a cow strongly influence the composition of their gut and how much methane they produce.

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Disease-free locals 'koalafy' as population protectors

Chlamydia-free koalas from Kangaroo Island may be needed to help save declining populations in other parts of Australia.

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New model suggests lost continents for early Earth

Earth scientists suggest that continents may have risen out of the sea much earlier than previously thought but were destroyed, leaving little trace.

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An incredible journey - the first people to arrive in Australia came in large numbers, and on purpose

It took more than 1,000 people to form a viable population in Australia. But this was no accidental migration, the first arrivals must have been planned, scientists say.

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No yee-haw: What endangered creature are your cowboy boots made from?

Researchers investigating the world’s exotic wildlife trade have made a startling discovery...

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