News & Events

Learn about what’s trending in science at the University of Adelaide with the latest news, events and social engagement from across the faculty and schools.

Science news

What's trending in science?

Adelaide scientist wins ‘bronze’ at global neurophotonics event

A project to map the hearing capability of zebrafish has won Mengke Han third prize at the global Frontiers in Neurophotonics’ summer school.

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Mediterranean drought-tolerant vines set for Australian experiment

Wine researchers are investigating drought-tolerant grape varieties from Cyprus for their suitability for Australian conditions.

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$35.6 million boost for sciences' research infrastructure

Research for a range of industrial sectors including scientific, advanced manufacturing, defence, resources, biomedical and agriculture has received a major boost.

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New ‘vet tech’ degree to target emerging skills gap

A new three-year Bachelor of Veterinary Technology at the University’s Roseworthy campus will train ‘paraveterinary’ health care specialists.

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Moo-ve over methane... Scientists show we can breed cattle that produce less gassy emissions

Animal scientists have found the genetics of a cow strongly influence the composition of their gut and how much methane they produce.

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Disease-free locals 'koalafy' as population protectors

Chlamydia-free koalas from Kangaroo Island may be needed to help save declining populations in other parts of Australia.

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New model suggests lost continents for early Earth

Earth scientists suggest that continents may have risen out of the sea much earlier than previously thought but were destroyed, leaving little trace.

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An incredible journey - the first people to arrive in Australia came in large numbers, and on purpose

It took more than 1,000 people to form a viable population in Australia. But this was no accidental migration, the first arrivals must have been planned, scientists say.

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No yee-haw: What endangered creature are your cowboy boots made from?

Researchers investigating the world’s exotic wildlife trade have made a startling discovery...

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New ‘king’ of fossils discovered on Kangaroo Island

Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island.

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A shore future for our coastal vegetation

Researchers are using new ways to gain genetic information from ocean sediment to determine the past and future survival of our coastal vegetation.

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Where do rocks come from?

Five-year-old Claire from Perth asks Professor Alan Collins, "where do rocks come from?"

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When pets become pests: the exotic pet trade producing invasive species

Scientists are learning more about what drives the exotic pet trade to help reduce the threat of new invasive animal and bird species.

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New leader for School of Biological Sciences

The University's biosciences research and education has been boosted by a new leader.

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Higher biodiversity means healthier humans

Scientists find restoring environments to include a wider range of species can promote ‘good’ bacteria over ‘bad’.

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Probe detects the mechanism for spreading of metastatic cancer cells

A new fluorescent sensor developed by researchers from the University of Adelaide can detect migrating cancer cells and could be used to target medication to stop metastasis in aggressive cancers.

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Plant discovery opens frontiers

Scientists discover biochemical mechanism fundamental to plant life that could have huge implications for biomedical, pharmaceutical, chemical and biotechnology industries.

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Deadly diseases to be hit by single vaccine

Scientists from the Research Centre for Infectious Diseases have developed a single vaccination approach to simultaneously combat influenza and pneumococcal infections.

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Pollen allergens: Are plants trying to kill us?

Pollen allergies have long been a major pandemic health problem for humans. Plant molecular geneticist Deborah Devis is learning that pollen proteins play a vital role in a plant's reproductive process.

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What you missed from 'Tasting Australia - the chemistry of wine'

There's exciting science you can find in your glass, writes viticulture and oenology graduate Lieke van der Hulst.

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The Fungus Olympics

The race is on to find new ways to tackle disease. That’s why we’re competing in this year’s Fungus Olympics.

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New director of world-leading plant research facility

The University of Adelaide-led world-leading facility that underpins innovative plant research in Australia has appointed its first Executive Director to drive future success.

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Why don’t horses sit or lie down even while sleeping?

Horses have a amazing ability to be able to sleep standing up. But they do also sleep lying down. If you’re a horse, you need to be able to do both.

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New leadership for food sciences research

South Australia’s multi-billion-dollar food industries will benefit from new scientific leadership in the state.

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Wild barley reveals drought tolerant traits that could improve elite cultivars

Scientists discover wild barley genes that could be used to improve drought tolerance in barley, the second most important cereal crop in Australia.

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Uncovering long-term growth histories in fishery species

Jasmin Martino investigates the use of ear stone chronologies for understanding long-term trends and drivers of growth in fisheries.

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Australia’s epic story: a tale of amazing people, amazing creatures & rising seas

The Australian continent has a remarkable history - a story of isolation, desiccation and resilience on an ark at the edge of the world.

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Lifting spirits: How you can get involved in the South Australian gin spike

The craft spirit scene in South Australia is booming. Here's how you can get involved in the art of spirit production and winemaking.

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Underground beetle breathing brainteaser solved

Scientists have uncovered how aquatic beetles breathe in underground water.

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