News: Biological Science

Modern apes smarter than pre-humans

Modern apes smarter than pre-humans

Scientists suggest living great apes are smarter than our pre-human ancestor Australopithecus, a group that included the famous ‘Lucy’.

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Why do trees lose their leaves?

winter deciduousness - Nicholas A. Tonelli (CC BY 2.0)

Professor Andrew Lowe says it all comes down to water.

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Gene scans provide deep insights into plant evolution

Gnetum gnemon (Nature)

The availability of high-quality plant genome sequences and advances in functional genomics is revolutionising our ability to understand plant evolution.

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New Ramsay Fellow in Applied Science

Ramsay Fellow Fiona Whelan

Fiona Whelan has been appointed as the newest Ramsay Fellow in Applied Science.

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Who's eating away Australia's national parks?

Kangaroos grazing

Australia’s national parks are under serious threat of overgrazing and native kangaroos are major contributors to the problem.

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Urban rewilding paper wins Bradshaw Medal

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A research paper that recommends increasing urban green spaces to prevent human disease, has won a significant award in its field.

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Marine biologists provide deep thoughts on kelp forests

Kelp image

Australian and New Zealand researchers have joined forces to document their view of kelp forests.

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Deep breath: this sea snake gathers oxygen through its forehead

Deep breath: this sea snake gathers oxygen through its forehead

Only fish have gills, right? Wrong. Scientists have found a snake that can breathe through the top of its own head.

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Why are fossils more often male?

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University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that fossil and museum collections around the world are home to more male than female mammals.

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