News: Australian Centre for Ancient DNA

Can we extract ancient DNA from dinosaurs?

Tarbosaurus dinosaur by 5350755 from Pixabay

Delve into the science behind ancient DNA – what exactly is it, and how easy is it to extract from remains?

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Tall Poppy awards for Uni of Adelaide researchers

SA Tall Poppy Award winners from the University of Adelaide. L to R Dr Hannah Wardill, Dr Alice Jones, Dr Catia Malvaso and Dr Dominic McAfee. (Absent: Dr Linda Armbrecht)

Five University of Adelaide researchers have won 2021 South Australian Young Tall Poppy Science Awards.

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Coronaviruses have been hijacking human genes for 20,000 years

Coronavirus graphic. Image by Gerd Altmann, from Pixabay.

Humans have been exposed to coronaviruses for more than 20,000 years, according to new University of Adelaide research.

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Don’t focus on genetic diversity to save our species

Once found throughout the semi-arid range country in South Australia, New South Wales and south-west Queensland, the yellow-footed rock wallaby is now endangered in Queensland and NSW and vulnerable in SA. Image by Philip Barrington from Pixabay.

Scientists have challenged the common assumption that genetic diversity of a species is a key indicator of extinction risk.

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Science awards celebrate academic, student and staff success

Science awards 2020 Linda Armbrecht

The recent Faculty of Sciences’ awards showcase celebrated research, teaching, leadership, professional staff and student success.

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Ancient DNA research reveals evolutionary secrets of Game of Thrones dire wolves

Artwork credit: Mauricio Antón/Nature. Caption: Somewhere in Southwestern North America during the late Pleistocene, a pack of dire wolves (Canis dirus) are feeding on their bison kill, while a pair of grey wolves (Canis lupus) approach in the hopes of scavenging. One of the dire wolves rushes in to confront the grey wolves, and their confrontation allows a comparison of the bigger, larger-headed and reddish-brown dire wolf with its smaller, grey relative.

University of Adelaide scientists have sequenced the ancient DNA of dire wolf fossils for the first time and uncovered new secrets of the animal made famous by the TV show Game of Thrones.

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$7m boost for sciences research

Researcher photo Linda Armbrecht

ARC Discovery projects showcase the dynamic breadth of sciences research at the University of Adelaide.

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Ancient DNA researchers surprised by genetic continuity of Andes civilisations

Andes mountains Peru

The first large-scale study of DNA belonging to ancient humans of the central Andes in South America has uncovered some surprising results.

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Why are fossils more often male?

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University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that fossil and museum collections around the world are home to more male than female mammals.

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